My Milk Was Off This Morning

lgmaking_tea_milk_1000_0056One of the more frustrating occurrences in one’s morning…the milk is off! Not good at all when one only notices it after one has poured said milk into one’s tea. A glance at the label and the mood does not get any better. The milk should have lasted for another three days at least. Granted, it is summer – at least in New Zealand – but hey, my fridge works, I drove straight home with my shopping a couple of days ago, the car is air conditioned and the store is five minutes down the road. Where is the problem then?

Let’s start with where the problem most certainly will not be found….at the source. There is nothing wrong with my milk when it leaves the cow. Farmers have a reasonably good handle on making sure it does not go off on the farm, the milk tankers collect like clockwork and the processors tend to get that bit right as well, i.e.; processing the stuff coming out of the cow in a timely and temperature controlled fashion into plastic bottles with various lid colours ready for distribution in chilled trucks. Sooo – if my milk goes off despite the processor having his cool chain under control, the milk sitting in the retailer’s fridge when I bought it and yours truly being able to look myself in the eye with a clear conscience re personal fridge discipline at home….what does that leave us with?

Well, my money is on the retail rear store area being the culprit. Or more precisely…the amount of time it takes for the milk to get from the store delivery dock into the rear store chilled area. All the other steps are dedicated…cow gives milk, farmer stores milk, tanker driver collects milk, factory processes milk, truckie delivers milk,  THEN  BIG BLACK HOLE, retail assistant restocks milk fridge, customer selects milk and takes milk and all other purchases home.

The BIG BLACK HOLE  in my mind is that I have seen several variations to the theme over the years when it comes to milk being delivered to the store. These are, in no particular order,

  • delivery driver leaves milk on rear dock and buggers off
  • delivery driver attempts to raise store receiving staff and when he fails in that endeavour, leaves milk on rear dock and buggers off
  • receiving staff see milk sitting on rear dock but don’t register that milk and sun don’t go together, so the milk stays put
  • receiving staff see milk, but have other priorities, with milk shifting being not being high on that list
  • receiving staff drag milk out of sun into the rear store proper but not straight away into the chilled area.

There are bound to be other scenarios as well but the ones I have listed here  serve the purpose of illustrating a critical aspect of supply chain management when it comes to fresh food, whether we are talking about milk, peaches or bagged salad. The sad truth is that effective  supply chain management is generally consistently achievable when the focus is on individual products or a group of products with similar characteristics and therefore needs. When products with different characteristics and needs appear at a critical supply chain node at the same time, a high degree of personal initiative, the ability to prioritise without waiting to be told and the capability to understand the ’cause and effect’ concept become crucial.

Do supermarkets really train their rear store receiving staff to work consistently to these principles? I think not.