The high cost of low prices

A few weeks ago we had the PMA Australia New Zealand Fresh Connections Conference here is Auckland. An all-round success in terms of attendance.  One of the industry stalwarts I bumped into there was Lex Wilcox, retired potato and onion grower/packer/shipper from Pukekohe and one of the brains behind the success of AS Wilcox Ltd in his day.  Lex has earned his retirement through decades of hard work for his company, the Pukekohe Vegetable Growers Association and the Vegetable & Potato Growers Federation, one of the predecessors of Horticulture New Zealand.

Catching up with Lex reminded me that he had sent me a 2006 article from the Sunday Start Times recently, entitled, “The high cost of low prices”, together with a philosophical statement by John Ruskin on the common law of business balance. Ruskin’s authorship of this ‘law’ can not be verified.  The one sentence version is “There is hardly anything in the world that someone cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price alone are that person’s lawful prey”.

Lex sent the article in response to my blog entry on “Supermarkets, Growers and Food Prices” which introduced an earlier Guardian article on the topic.  Long before the supermarket bread war kicked off last weekend.  Lex’s article makes interesting reading – as does the longer version of the Ruskin quote.

It is an interesting social dilemma that is being played out.  Supermarkets compete for market share on the basis of product/price specials. Nothing wrong with that.  Consumers have come to expect ‘hot deals’ every week.  And they’d better be good or they vote with their feet.  Should suppliers contribute to supermarkets lowering their retail prices to attract more shoppers through their door? I don’t see why not, as long as the consultation process is alive and well, suppliers are not expected to produce loss leaders on a scale that threatens the viability of their overall business and when accompanied with a ‘give and take’ attitude.

These bread wars are not the last product/price action we have seen.  The game is changing. Online shopping is gaining favour with consumers globally.  Brick and mortar investments into new stores are getting harder to justify and being caught in the middle is not a pleasant experience any longer.  Tesco is the perfect example right now.

Comments

Comment from alisa
Time April 11, 2016 at 14:49

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