TURDUCKEN ANYONE?

Turducken Source: wikipedia

Turducken
Source: wikipedia

December, 25th, 2013

This is a Christmas story of a different kind. As you read on, you may well think that I have lost the plot altogether, you may wonder where the Christmas connection  takes us, but rest assured there is a Christmas aspect to this story, one that reaches beyond the Christmas Day we are celebrating today in 2013. I watched the news last night and in addition to the guts and glory coverage that television news is all about these days there was a human interest story related to Christmas that that caught my attention. The central theme of the news item was a unique Christmas roast that few people had heard of, that was in increasing demand and had its origins in the Middle Ages.  The roast is called a Turducken, which is a chicken, complete with stuffing, stuffed into a duck and the duck then stuffed into a turkey. The news item featured a Farro Fresh Market and one of its founders was being interviewed about the Turducken phenomenon. A fascinating food story, told in an innovative fresh food retail environment. What a fantastic marketing opportunity.

Cut. Change of Scenery.

In 1996 I rejoined Progressive Enterprises, then owner of Foodtown, Countdown and Three Guys supermarkets and itself owned by Foodland (FAL) , then  a grocery co-operative in Perth, Western Australia. The management team was given three core objectives by the owners. Firstly, streamline the merchandise and operations departments run separately hitherto, into one effective system; secondly, develop the food retail concept of the future; thirdly, improve operating profits. By 1998, the first objective had been achieved. The category management and buying teams had been combined and the operations management structure had been merged into one. A new meal solution concept had also been established and it was being “road tested” at Foodtown Meadowbank. This concept reduced emphasis on selling ingredients and meal components and focused instead on providing shoppers with complete meal solutions depending upon the time they visited the store. An entire kitchen team inclusive of an executive chef was based at the store. The third objective, improving margins, proved a little more difficult.  Restructuring does take time and costs money.  The fact that the Foodtown and Countdown IT platforms were incompatible and needed to be reconstructed from the ground up did not help either.  Nor was margin growth assisted by the fact that the Countdown merchandise sales management & reporting process was a store by store affair which caused major difficulties in understanding category profitability across the group.

In early 1998 FAL lost patience with its New Zealand division – which they did not understand at the best of times.  To put this statement into perspective…Perth based FAL in the nineties was akin to a bunch Four Square grocers having come together and with Progressive they had a tiger by the tail.  The FAL owners understood the grocery business very well…but grocers are not necessarily known for their innovation and strategic foresight when it comes to fundamentally reinventing themselves. And having paid top dollar for Progressive when they bought the chain from the then Coles Myer a few years earlier, they wanted to see a return on investment.

Source: www.allposters.com/

Source: www.allposters.com

Graeme Kelly, the CEO they had only hired a couple of years early was sent packing and after a short intermezzo by Barry Alty, a Kiwi grocer turned Perth based Aussie, FAL recruited Ted van Arkel, a Kiwi based grocer of Dutch heritage as Alty’s deputy and eventual successor.

Ted was a grocer from way back, Woolworths trained, who knew the grocery business upside down, back to front and left to right.  The Meadowbank innovation was initially parked for review and then quietly abandoned. The stores were refocused on the core grocery business, integration of operating systems was further strengthened and the bottom line started to show the improvements the owners in far away Perth were expecting.

Cut. Change of Scenery.

I am a father of three adult children these days.  Doesn’t time fly. My daughter works for a global market research company in Frankfurt, Germany.  My older son is both a history teacher and New Zealand naval officer (don’t ask…it’s complicated). My younger son has just finished a Bachelor of Design and Visual Arts (Photography) degree at Unitec and will hopefully find his fulfillment as an artist.

Earlier this year he started talking about Unitec wanting to essentially make the entire design faculty redundant. He was concerned about that, both from his perspective as well as from that of the affected staff.  Naturally, once these plans were made known to the lecturers, they were no longer entirely focused on the learning needs of their students. Unitec’s position was that the Faculty and the courses it offered needed to be realigned with the core focus of Unitec as a technical tertiary institution.   Reading between the lines….someone clearly thought that there was too much art going on and that the place needed to concentrate on churning out craftsmen instead of artists.

Staff got their redundancy notices on the day the students opened  their end of year exhibition – where they could have benefited from the support of focused staff.  Instead, the staff involved the students in black armband protests and other forms of “passive resistance”. It was not good to observe what was going on.

I had not fully tuned in when my son started talking about the demise of his Faculty.  Partly because I was busy with other things and partly because I knew that by the time these changes were due to take place in 2014, he would have graduated and be on his way.  So it was not until a couple of weeks ago that I went to the Unitec website to check on the composition of the Unitec Council. Interesting.

Cut. Change of  Scenery

Christmas is the time for reflection. When I reflect about how my shopping behaviour has changed in the last three years, I realise that I spend quite a bit of my time, and more importantly money, at Farro Fresh Markets.  They sell the food I enjoy eating. Their stores offer a mix between grocery retailing and retail theatre that I don’t find in the traditional Countdown, New World or Pak’ n Save outlets.  They sell decent Spanish and French wines for a fraction of the price one has to pay for local Pinot Noir.  Their cheese selection is a shoppers’ magnet. A Farro Fresh Market is not necessarily exactly what the 1996 Progressive team  had envisaged…but Farro is the closest to the retail concept Progressive had in mind back then…and their opportunity came when Progressive consigned anything other than the expert grocery model to the ‘too hard’ basket.

What are the big learnings here for me?

  • Horses for courses.
  • Timing is everything.
  • There is a difference between a supermarket and a Design School.
  • The consumers’ food procurement model is changing at a rapid pace.
  • The shopping model I grew up with does not  meet the needs of today’s consumers.
  • Thank God for options, choice and innovation.

The clock will tick over soon. 2013  becomes history and the fledgling 2014 will spread its wings. Let’s hope we can learn from past mistakes and avoid repeating them.

And the practice of stuffing birds within birds and serving them fried or baked at table seems to date  back way beyond the Middle Ages, right down to the Romans and their famous banquets.