What Value Do We Put On Fruit?

New Zealand Apples, by Edward Cole, ca. 1925-1935. Alexander Turnbull Library. Eph-E-FRUIT-1930s-01

New Zealand Apples, by Edward Cole, ca. 1925-1935. Alexander Turnbull Library. Eph-E-FRUIT-1930s-01

Apples for 9 cents in Hastings.  It does not get much cheaper than that.  What do we think?  Right or wrong?  Well, actually both.  Consumers will, of course, be happy.  Cheap fruit, hurray, like the good old days. All the ancient  images come to mind. Families consisting of Mum, Dad and the two kids, living on their quarter acre paradise, spending the weekends in the garden….to quote Tui Breweries…”Yeah Right”.

What a load of crock.  What did the consumer say interviewed in the paper?  “I get the good ones out and use them for juicing…”  Oh yeah, what state are the other ones at then?  Yes, supermarkets based in a key production area should use their buying power to offer consumers good deals.  And if there is an association between store owner and orchardist – even better.  But to offer fruit where the best of the lot is just good enough for juicing to consumers who are looking for a genuinely better deal for their fresh fruit and veg is just a cheap stunt.  Bad move guys.  All this does is to bring the whole apple category into disrepute. Not good in the long term.  Not good at all.

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Comment from nilson
Time April 11, 2016 at 14:24

this is the test comment for testing

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